MAMU November 19 eNewsletter
MAMU November 19 eNewsletter
How Feedback Can Improve Your Recruitment Strategy
November 2019

Employee Benefits: Make Them Easy to Buy and Use
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If you want employees to use their benefits, it needs to be easy.

One of my favorite phrases is “make it easy to buy and easy to use”. I learned it years ago in the hospitality industry. If you want to upsell a restaurant guest, make it easy for them to buy the premium product and use it. Basically, as the guest, I simply want to pay and enjoy.
This concept applies to other products and services too. For example, if you want me to upgrade my technology subscription then make it easy to buy and easy to use. If I have to logout, download a new app, reset my password, and it still doesn’t work, then this doesn’t make me want to spend the extra money.
How Feedback Can Improve Your Recruitment Strategy
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The future of workplace safety!

Finding the right candidates is not easy, especially in a competitive job market. Attracting and retaining your future superstars is among the C-suite’s most significant concerns for organizational success and understandably so. Turnover is expensive and directly impacts your organization’s performance on many levels.

The direct costs of running ads and HR’s time vetting candidates add up and these numbers are at the low end of the cost spectrum.

Restart Your Safety Program After an Accident
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Better safe than sorry.

When an accident on the job site occurs, it affects everybody. It’s an emotionally-charged time full of “what ifs” that forces everybody involved to face the reality that everything can change in an instant. But what follows is equally stressful because accidents and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) go hand-in-hand.

Protected Activity or Terminable Misconduct?
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Fueled by the belief on the current employees have an unfettered, protected "right" to engage in self-help discovery

It has become almost routine for employees pursuing whistleblower and other employment-related claims against their employer to engage in "self-help discovery," using their access to files and databases to collect and gather, in violation of company policy, documents and data relating to their claims. The company often becomes aware of this type of misconduct during internal investigations, when a forensic review of the complainant's computer or statements by witnesses reveal that the complainant has collected or is collecting evidence. Or, the misconduct may not become evident until after the employee has filed a charge or a lawsuit, when confidential company documents are referenced in the charge or complaint or the employer undertakes discovery.